Elenamary

crissle:

It has been less than two months since I started a new job and moved away from St. Louis, Missouri. The murder of Michael Brown and the attacks on others in Ferguson, Missouri have been devastating to read about this week. I have thought time and again of the semester that I taught Invisible Man…

independentcreativeservices:

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The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the Southwest…

aamerrahman:

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This is my response (originally published in Crikey) to Mark Sawyer’s article ‘How Racist Are You’ published in The Age and Sydney Morning Herald last week (http://www.smh.com.au/comment/how-racist-are-you-20140611-zs43h.html)

Dear Mark,

As a comedian I very much appreciated your…
thepeoplesrecord:

More than 100 Mexican women take up arms to defend communityAugust 26, 2013
More than 100 women in the southern Mexican town of Xaltianguis have taken up arms to protect their community from organized crime groups, a local self-defense force official said Monday.
The women signed up over the past four days with the Union of Peoples and Organizations of Guerrero State, or UPOEG, Xaltianguis community self-defense force commander Miguel Angel Jimenez told reporters.
"We have an average of nine groups" of community police, with each one made up of 12 women who will work in the daytime in the neighborhoods of Xaltianguis, located about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the resort city of Acapulco, Jimenez said.
The women will be trained in the use of firearms and carry the same weapons as men, Jimenez said.
The vigilante group has only about 80 firearms and the weapons are rotated among members, Jimenez said.
"I trust that the people, once they know that the women are participating," will provide more weapons, Jimenez said.
Women were among the biggest supporters when the community self-defense forces were being formed, telling men that “either you join or I join,” Jimenez said.
"Women are brave and we are capable of defending our town," Silvia Hipolito, a mother of two who joined the self-defense group, said.
The women will learn how to use firearms and work schedules that allow them to continue taking care of their homes, Hipolito said.
UPOEG, whose members are armed and wear hoods, was created in January in Guerrero state’s Costa Chica region.
The self-defense group controls access to communities and polices them to fight crime blamed on drug traffickers and other organized crime groups.
Vigilante groups have appeared in recent months in several Mexican states, with the largest number being reported in Guerrero and the western state of Michoacan.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

More than 100 Mexican women take up arms to defend community
August 26, 2013

More than 100 women in the southern Mexican town of Xaltianguis have taken up arms to protect their community from organized crime groups, a local self-defense force official said Monday.

The women signed up over the past four days with the Union of Peoples and Organizations of Guerrero State, or UPOEG, Xaltianguis community self-defense force commander Miguel Angel Jimenez told reporters.

"We have an average of nine groups" of community police, with each one made up of 12 women who will work in the daytime in the neighborhoods of Xaltianguis, located about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from the resort city of Acapulco, Jimenez said.

The women will be trained in the use of firearms and carry the same weapons as men, Jimenez said.

The vigilante group has only about 80 firearms and the weapons are rotated among members, Jimenez said.

"I trust that the people, once they know that the women are participating," will provide more weapons, Jimenez said.

Women were among the biggest supporters when the community self-defense forces were being formed, telling men that “either you join or I join,” Jimenez said.

"Women are brave and we are capable of defending our town," Silvia Hipolito, a mother of two who joined the self-defense group, said.

The women will learn how to use firearms and work schedules that allow them to continue taking care of their homes, Hipolito said.

UPOEG, whose members are armed and wear hoods, was created in January in Guerrero state’s Costa Chica region.

The self-defense group controls access to communities and polices them to fight crime blamed on drug traffickers and other organized crime groups.

Vigilante groups have appeared in recent months in several Mexican states, with the largest number being reported in Guerrero and the western state of Michoacan.

Source

The group, which focuses on the construction industry in Texas, has emerged as one of the nation’s most creative and responsive organizations for immigrant workers.

YELL AT RACISTS

yoisthisracist:

anonymous asked: My grandpa used to say racist shit but some of my cousins and I made it a point to yell at him about it, and he hasn’t in a long time, and my mom says it upset him that we were so bothered by it so he tried to change and did. So, you know, it isn’t fucking futile, don’t assume they’re too old to get it right; if you love them have some faith that they are capable of not being totally shitty.

SOMETIMES YOU CAN FIX RACISTS WITH YELLING

thinkmexican:

Disney ‘Día de los Muertos’ Trademark Underscores Need to Reject Corporate Pandering
Upoar over trademark is justified, but Mexicans enabling cultural appropriation is the real problem
The Indigenous Peoples of Mexico have observed what is today known as Día de los Muertos since time immemorial.
The Spanish and the Catholic Church attempted to destroy this ceremony, and when they couldn’t, it was incorporated into the Catholic religious calendar. Centuries later, Mexicans are dealing with another colonizer, expect this one is from Burbank and is called Disney.
In April of 2012, reports surfaced that “Toy Story 3” director Lee Unkrich was planning to produce an animated feature based on Día de los Muertos. The LA Times called it a “nod to Mexican audiences,” and many of us seemed to agree.
Fast forward to May 1, 2013 — just a few days ago — and Disney attorney Kevin Daley, is filing 10 trademark applications with the US Patent and Trademark Office for the term ‘Día de los Muertos’ for use in promotional products ranging from backpacks to cookies.
For many, this is where the problem started. But, in essence, Disney is simply doing what multinational corporations do: protect and commoditize. Are we so to naive to believe Disney would make this movie and not attempt to trademark ‘Día de los Muertos’ out of respect for our culture?
For those expressing disaproval and outrage throughout the blogosphere today: where were the petitions and angry tweets in April 2012 when Disney announced a Pixarized version of this sacred ancestral tradition?
Of course we should make our voice heard, but at this point, we need to demand Disney not make “The Untitled Pixar Movie About Día de los Muertos.”
And the end of the day, there’s no such thing as a gentle violation of our culture. Corporations will forever be eager to profit off our culture if we let them, so let’s use this latest episode as an opportunity to examine our role in our exploitation and to take a look at how we’re helping to preserve our cultural heritage our cultural heritage for future generations.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Disney ‘Día de los Muertos’ Trademark Underscores Need to Reject Corporate Pandering

Upoar over trademark is justified, but Mexicans enabling cultural appropriation is the real problem

The Indigenous Peoples of Mexico have observed what is today known as Día de los Muertos since time immemorial.

The Spanish and the Catholic Church attempted to destroy this ceremony, and when they couldn’t, it was incorporated into the Catholic religious calendar. Centuries later, Mexicans are dealing with another colonizer, expect this one is from Burbank and is called Disney.

In April of 2012, reports surfaced that “Toy Story 3” director Lee Unkrich was planning to produce an animated feature based on Día de los Muertos. The LA Times called it a “nod to Mexican audiences,” and many of us seemed to agree.

Fast forward to May 1, 2013 — just a few days ago — and Disney attorney Kevin Daley, is filing 10 trademark applications with the US Patent and Trademark Office for the term ‘Día de los Muertos’ for use in promotional products ranging from backpacks to cookies.

For many, this is where the problem started. But, in essence, Disney is simply doing what multinational corporations do: protect and commoditize. Are we so to naive to believe Disney would make this movie and not attempt to trademark ‘Día de los Muertos’ out of respect for our culture?

For those expressing disaproval and outrage throughout the blogosphere today: where were the petitions and angry tweets in April 2012 when Disney announced a Pixarized version of this sacred ancestral tradition?

Of course we should make our voice heard, but at this point, we need to demand Disney not make “The Untitled Pixar Movie About Día de los Muertos.”

And the end of the day, there’s no such thing as a gentle violation of our culture. Corporations will forever be eager to profit off our culture if we let them, so let’s use this latest episode as an opportunity to examine our role in our exploitation and to take a look at how we’re helping to preserve our cultural heritage our cultural heritage for future generations.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

yoisthisracist:

anonymous asked: Should I give my friends who say racist shit an explanation for why I’m cutting them out, or just peace out on them dicks?

You can just peace out on them dicks, if you want.

omnommoms:

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A while back I got turned on to the Green Monster Movement (http://greenmonstermovement.com/?cat=3 ), and I’m kind of hooked. I’ve always been a smoothie fan, but I’ve never been able to afford a juicer (and it’s likely I wouldn’t have the patience for it anyway), so this concept of…